A Haunted Harbor

ANTHONY: You learn some crazy shit about those lighthouses. Been up there since when this was all basically England. Since this was all basically Yorkshire, or Shropshire, or some such shit. Like there’s this one out in the harbor? The space right beyond it right, you sail into it, and you can’t hear anything, it’s like a, like a black hole?

Anthony’s referring to the lighthouse in the Boston Harbor called the Boston Light that was originally built in 1716 and a part of the ocean past Little Brewster Island called the “Ghost Walk.” Many legends are connected to the lighthouse and ghost walk. Read this for more info:

Boston Light is the oldest lighthouse in America, originally built in 1716 on Little Brewster Island at the entrance of Boston Harbor. It’s no surprise that a number of legends are associated with such a historic landmark. After all, it has borne witness to countless
shipwrecks near the island as well as the drownings of its first two keepers
shortly after taking their assignments. Many believe that Boston Light is
haunted–and with good reason. Apparitions have been seen drifting through the
lantern room, feline mascots hiss at unseen presences, unexplained footsteps
are sometimes heard, and cold spots have been widely reported.Several miles east of Little Brewster Island, there’s a peculiar area of the ocean that locals call the “Ghost Walk.” Here
there seems to be some sort of atmospheric anomaly that prevents sound from
entering the area. Even the enormous bell from Boston Light cannot be heard in
the Ghost Walk. The phenomena received so much hype in the late 1800s that a
team of students from Massachusetts Institute of Technology was dispatched to
Little Brewster Island for an entire summer to experiment with foghorn signals
in an attempt to reach the area in question. No signal–not even with the
largest horn or siren–was able to penetrate the mysterious sound barrier. It
remains unexplained to this day.

Source: Haunted Massachusetts: Ghosts and Strange
Phenomena of the Bay State by Cheri Revai, p
66-67.

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