Tag Archives: Fran

Anthony’s Comedy Act Inspiration, Pt. 2

ANTHONY: I do got this show.

NICOLE: Like music?

ANTHONY: No jokes. Stories. Jokes really.

NICOLE: Yeah? Say a joke.

In addition to Chris Tucker, Dave Chappelle, a comedian known for his self-titled comedy show, The Dave Chappelle Show (2003-2006), also dealt with complicated racial issues in his sketches, which created a complicated relationship with his audience.

Here are some bits from his show:

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Anthony’s Comedy Act Inspiration

ANTHONY: As long as you got drumsticks and gravy and stuffing then it’s going to be O-Keedoke for sheezle mistokey.

FRAN looks at ANTHONY

ANTHONY grins.

ANTHONY: It’s for me act. I’m writing all my funny lines down for my new comedy act.

Comedian and actor Chris Tucker (b. 1971) would be one of Anthony’s contemporary influences in the 1990s. Here are some videos from his stand up routines as well as scenes from his Rush Hour series.

  (Rush Hour clips start at 4:30)

A History of Feeding America’s Children

CLIVE: We was all fired about about LBJ and it was spring time and we thought we was gonna go make a difference and we both signed up to hand out the free lunch.  For the summer, when there’s no school and kids go five, six hours no food cause they ain’t got much at home. Summertime came and they had me drive the van with the lunch and they had Gloria Giosa, once we pulled up to the pool or the playground, hand out the free lunch and we got to talking that summer and turns out we saw a lot more things eye to eye than we even thought—

The National School Lunch Act was passed in 1946 after congress determined that providing school age students with a nutritious meal was important enough to warrant securing federal funds every fiscal year. In addition to federal funds, the states are also required to contribute financially to the operation of the program.

 “The need for a permanent legislative basis for a school lunch program, rather than operating it on a year-to-year basis, or one dependent solely on agricultural surpluses that for a child may be nutritionally unbalanced or nutritionally unattractive, has now become apparent. The expansion of the program has been hampered by lack of basic legislation. If there is an assurance of continuity over a period of years, the encouragement of State contribution and participation in the school lunch program will be of great advantage in expanding the program.

“The national school lunch bill provides basic, comprehensive legislation for aid, in general, to the States in the operation of school lunch programs as permanent and- integral parts of their school systems…. Such aid, heretofore extended by Congress through the Department of Agriculture has, for the past 10 years, proven for exceptional benefit to the children, schools, and agriculture of the country a a whole, but the necessity for now coordinating the work throughout the Nation, and especially to encourage and increase the financial participation and active control by the several States makes it desirable that permanent enabling legislation take the place of the present temporary legislative structure…. The educational features of a properly chosen diet served at school should not be under-emphasized. Not only is the child taught what a good diet consists of, but his parents and family likewise are indirectly instructed.”

There are three types of lunches: Type A, Type B, and Type C. This is a graph that shows types A and B:

                  Type A Type B
Milk, whole 1/2 pint 2 pint
Protein-rich food consisting of any of the following or a combination thereof:

  • Fresh or processed meat, poultry meat,cheese, cooked or canned fish
  • Dry peas or beans or soy beans, cooked
  • Peanut Butter
  • Eggs
2 oz.½ cup

4 tbsp.

1

1 oz.¼ cup

2 tbsp.

1/2

Raw, cooked, or canned vegetables or fruits, or both ¾ cup ½ cup
Bread, muffins or hot bread made of whole grain cereal or enriched flour 1 portion 1 portion
Butter or fortified  margarine 2 tsp 1 tsp.

In 1966, the Child Nutrition Act was passed into law. This law included extending the Special Milk Program, starting the Pilot Breakfast Program, and centralizing all school food programs.  Read more here.

Guidelines for families who qualified for free or reduced lunch had to be established at the beginning of each fiscal year. As of July 1, 1970 the poverty threshold for a family of four was an income of $3,720 or less a year.

In 1968, an amendment to the Child Nutrition Act created the Summer Food Service Program. The SFSP is a federally funded program that provides free lunch for children who live in low-income areas when school is not in session.

The Open Road: the Life of a Trucker

FRAN: You should go back to school. You should see how many credits—
ANTHONY: Nah, I’m thinking the open road. Me behind the wheel, on the open road. You can train to haul one of those big rigs in like no time, see the whole country right? That’s it, that’s what I’m gonna do.

Trucker Training:

professional-truck-driver
http://bit.ly/19H1m4o

In order to receive a Commercial Driver’s License, the state of Massachusetts requires that you be at least 21 years of age and have not had your driver’s license or right to operate taken away by the Registrar.

From the MA DMV about Commercial Driver Education:

If you want a Commercial Driver’s License, you’re going to have to pass some tough federal and state requirements. The Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles (RMV) requires you to take and pass a 50-question exam, with a minimum of 40 correct answers to pass.

And that’s just to get the learner’s permit. Obtaining a Class A or Class B CDL requires you to pass a road test that will encompass a vehicle inspection and driving in a closed course and on the road.

Many CDL applicants take classes at private truck driving schools. These classes offer both classroom and hands-on instruction and are designed to help you pass the written and road exams. The schools even provide trucks and licensed instructors to help you pass the exam.

The good news: You can learn everything you need to know in 10 days to two weeks and classes are offered regularly. The bad news: These schools can be expensive. Expect to pay $5,000 and more to attend one of these sessions.

CDL Career Now lists CDL training facilities in and around Boston.

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http://bit.ly/1bHgp45

On the Road:

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) specifies that truckers are limited to 11 cumulative hours driving in a 14-hour period, following a rest period of no less than 10 consecutive hours. Drivers employed by carriers in “daily operation” may not work more than 70 hours within any period of 8 consecutive days. These stipulations are put in place to make sure that drivers’ abilities are not impaired by exhaustion.

Some drivers are paid by the hour, and some by the mile.

For information about life on the road, check out www.lifeasatrucker.com

Pahk the Cah in Hahvahd Yahd

Our excellent dialect coach Liz Hayes sent along a series of videos as touchstones for the sound of the fictional town in which SPLENDOR is set.

Some are available for embedding here, but not all, so follow the links.

Let’s start with THIS ONE, which may be particularly helpful for Gloria.

Here’s a great one of Somerville’s Mayor Joseph Curtatone:

 

In general, the SomervilleCity TV YouTube channel is kind of a gold mine. Check it out HERE. (After all, it includes gem like THIS!)

 

 

I’m Like a Gypsy Now

GLORIA: […] the mother says “This is not your cat. It is my cat” and all the kids all her kids stare out at me and I know it’s mine but no one will say it’s mine and I think that’s something, that is really something, you just, you just have to claim things. I’m like a gypsy now.  I learned my lesson, boy.  I never looked at anything in my parent’s house the same ever again: who owns anything?  It’s a joke.  It’s a joke on all of us and the Indians and the gypsies.  On all of us.    

Gloria, a strong-willed woman who breaks from the expectations of her family and community, is also a self-proclaimed “gypsy.” To her, this means someone who lives by her own rules, who doesn’t wait for people to give her what she needs, who questions the cultural norms of ownership — a direct rejection of her family’s more wealthy, conservative ways.

Gloria taps into the modern mythology of gypsies — a non-unified group who prefer to be called Roma/Romani (Eastern European descent) or Travellers (Irish descent) — as a base for her personal philosophy. Today, the idea of the gypsy has been so thrust into pop culture that you can watch “reality” television shows like My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding, American Gypsies, and Gypsy Sisters, but Gloria fell in love with the romantic ideal long before TLC got their hands on it.

While today the Travellers and Romani are subject to skepticism, distrust, and discrimination (especially within the European Union), Gloria models herself on her  impressions of their approach to life. She is a highly moral person, but her moral universe is one of her own design — solidly framed in right and wrong, but perhaps not the same notions of right and wrong that those around her abide by. …A philosophy she thinks of as gypsy-like.

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I’ll Ask to Be the Pilgrim Next Year

FRAN: I’ll ask to be a Pilgrim next year so I can wear that dress: the Pilgrim dress.
NICOLE: I don’t wanna wear a friggin dress. How many times are we gonna do this same stupid thing over and over:  the pilgrims come, the Indians put fish in the ground to grow the corn, the Pilgrims are happy—
FRAN: Thankful.
NICOLE: Who cares? If I have to be in this same play over and over every year til I die wearing a dress made out of black construction paper please kill me now before Thanksgiving comes again.

Yup, a standard-issue Thanksgiving Pageant…

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