Tag Archives: history

A Haunted Harbor

ANTHONY: You learn some crazy shit about those lighthouses. Been up there since when this was all basically England. Since this was all basically Yorkshire, or Shropshire, or some such shit. Like there’s this one out in the harbor? The space right beyond it right, you sail into it, and you can’t hear anything, it’s like a, like a black hole?

Anthony’s referring to the lighthouse in the Boston Harbor called the Boston Light that was originally built in 1716 and a part of the ocean past Little Brewster Island called the “Ghost Walk.” Many legends are connected to the lighthouse and ghost walk. Read this for more info:

Boston Light is the oldest lighthouse in America, originally built in 1716 on Little Brewster Island at the entrance of Boston Harbor. It’s no surprise that a number of legends are associated with such a historic landmark. After all, it has borne witness to countless
shipwrecks near the island as well as the drownings of its first two keepers
shortly after taking their assignments. Many believe that Boston Light is
haunted–and with good reason. Apparitions have been seen drifting through the
lantern room, feline mascots hiss at unseen presences, unexplained footsteps
are sometimes heard, and cold spots have been widely reported.Several miles east of Little Brewster Island, there’s a peculiar area of the ocean that locals call the “Ghost Walk.” Here
there seems to be some sort of atmospheric anomaly that prevents sound from
entering the area. Even the enormous bell from Boston Light cannot be heard in
the Ghost Walk. The phenomena received so much hype in the late 1800s that a
team of students from Massachusetts Institute of Technology was dispatched to
Little Brewster Island for an entire summer to experiment with foghorn signals
in an attempt to reach the area in question. No signal–not even with the
largest horn or siren–was able to penetrate the mysterious sound barrier. It
remains unexplained to this day.

Source: Haunted Massachusetts: Ghosts and Strange
Phenomena of the Bay State by Cheri Revai, p
66-67.

Daughters of the American Revolution

Gloria: My aunt Frances did everything right. Exactly two weeks before my birthday she’d send a little card, a little invitation. She’d take me to the swan boats, high tea. I’m sure, I’m wicked sure (she laughs) my parents thought she’d rub off on me, have me marrying a banker and swapping recipe cards with my sister Paula whose personal goals include getting swallowed whole by the D.A.R.

The Daughters of the American Revolution (D.A.R.), was founded on October 11, 1890 in order to spread patriotism, historical preservation, and education throughout the country at a time when women were excluded from men’s organizations. These are the organization’s three main goals:

Historical – to perpetuate the memory and spirit of the men and women who achieved American Independence; Educational – to carry out the injunction of Washington in his farewell address to the American people, “to promote, as an object of primary importance, institutions for the general diffusion of knowledge, thus developing an enlightened public opinion…”; and Patriotic – to cherish, maintain, and extend the institutions of American freedom, to foster true patriotism and love of country, and to aid in securing for mankind all the blessings of liberty.

DAR members volunteer more than 250,000 hours annually to veteran patients, award thousands of dollars in scholarships and financial aid each year to students, and support schools for underserved children with annual donations exceeding one million dollars.

As one of the most inclusive genealogical societies in the country, DAR boasts 175,000 members in 3,000 chapters across the United States and internationally. Any woman 18 years or older-regardless of race, religion, or ethnic background-who can prove lineal descent from a patriot of the American Revolution, is eligible for membership.

To join the DAR, you must be 18 years or older and have direct lineage from an American Revolution patriot. Here’s a video from their YouTube channel.

View more videos from the D.A.R.’s YouTube channel here.

 

A History of Feeding America’s Children

CLIVE: We was all fired about about LBJ and it was spring time and we thought we was gonna go make a difference and we both signed up to hand out the free lunch.  For the summer, when there’s no school and kids go five, six hours no food cause they ain’t got much at home. Summertime came and they had me drive the van with the lunch and they had Gloria Giosa, once we pulled up to the pool or the playground, hand out the free lunch and we got to talking that summer and turns out we saw a lot more things eye to eye than we even thought—

The National School Lunch Act was passed in 1946 after congress determined that providing school age students with a nutritious meal was important enough to warrant securing federal funds every fiscal year. In addition to federal funds, the states are also required to contribute financially to the operation of the program.

 “The need for a permanent legislative basis for a school lunch program, rather than operating it on a year-to-year basis, or one dependent solely on agricultural surpluses that for a child may be nutritionally unbalanced or nutritionally unattractive, has now become apparent. The expansion of the program has been hampered by lack of basic legislation. If there is an assurance of continuity over a period of years, the encouragement of State contribution and participation in the school lunch program will be of great advantage in expanding the program.

“The national school lunch bill provides basic, comprehensive legislation for aid, in general, to the States in the operation of school lunch programs as permanent and- integral parts of their school systems…. Such aid, heretofore extended by Congress through the Department of Agriculture has, for the past 10 years, proven for exceptional benefit to the children, schools, and agriculture of the country a a whole, but the necessity for now coordinating the work throughout the Nation, and especially to encourage and increase the financial participation and active control by the several States makes it desirable that permanent enabling legislation take the place of the present temporary legislative structure…. The educational features of a properly chosen diet served at school should not be under-emphasized. Not only is the child taught what a good diet consists of, but his parents and family likewise are indirectly instructed.”

There are three types of lunches: Type A, Type B, and Type C. This is a graph that shows types A and B:

                  Type A Type B
Milk, whole 1/2 pint 2 pint
Protein-rich food consisting of any of the following or a combination thereof:

  • Fresh or processed meat, poultry meat,cheese, cooked or canned fish
  • Dry peas or beans or soy beans, cooked
  • Peanut Butter
  • Eggs
2 oz.½ cup

4 tbsp.

1

1 oz.¼ cup

2 tbsp.

1/2

Raw, cooked, or canned vegetables or fruits, or both ¾ cup ½ cup
Bread, muffins or hot bread made of whole grain cereal or enriched flour 1 portion 1 portion
Butter or fortified  margarine 2 tsp 1 tsp.

In 1966, the Child Nutrition Act was passed into law. This law included extending the Special Milk Program, starting the Pilot Breakfast Program, and centralizing all school food programs.  Read more here.

Guidelines for families who qualified for free or reduced lunch had to be established at the beginning of each fiscal year. As of July 1, 1970 the poverty threshold for a family of four was an income of $3,720 or less a year.

In 1968, an amendment to the Child Nutrition Act created the Summer Food Service Program. The SFSP is a federally funded program that provides free lunch for children who live in low-income areas when school is not in session.

LBJ and the Great Society

CLIVE: School. Yep, yep. That’s how your mother and I got to talking. One day in civics they do whole lesson on LBJ, you know LBJ?
ANTHONY: Well, yeah, I—
CLIVE: Great Society. Have and have nots and til then Gloria Giosa barely gave me the time of day, right? She had herself a little after school job down the town hall and soon’s the bell rang off she go but one day Gloria Giosa and I got to talking and it turned out Gloria Giosa and I saw things eye to eye. We was all fired about about LBJ and it was spring time and we thought we was gonna go make a difference and we both signed up to hand out the free lunch…

Lyndon B. Johnson, the 36th president of the United States, promoted a series of domestic programs in the 1960s that were known as the Great Society. The two main goals of the programs were to eliminate poverty and racial injustice. In scope, the Great Society most closely resembled Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal.

Great Society programs were enacted throughout the 1960s. Notable programs that were introduced during the Great Society and continue to this day include Medicare, Medicaid, the Older Americans act, improvements to Social Security, the National Endowment for the Arts, and federal funding for education.

Highlight from Johnson’s Great Society speech, given in 1964 in Ann Arbor, MI:

“The Great Society rests on abundance and liberty for all. It demands an end to poverty and racial injustice, to which we are totally committed in out time. But that is just the beginning.

The Great Society is a place where every child can find knowledge to enrich his mind and to enlarge his talents. It is a place where leisure is a welcome chance to build and reflect, not a feared cause of boredom and restlessness. It is a place where the city of man serves not only the needs of the body and the demands of commerce but the desire for beauty and the hunger for community.

It is a place where man can renew contact with nature. It is a place which honors creation for its own sake and for what is adds to the understanding of the race. It is a place where men are more concerned with the quality of their goals than the quantity of their goods.

But most of all, the Great Society is not a safe harbor, a resting place, a final objective, a finished work. It is a challenge constantly renewed, beckoning us toward a destiny where the meaning of our lives matches the marvelous products of our labor.”

Read the full text of Johnson’s speech here.

Thanksgiving’s a Black Man’s Holiday

CLIVE: Thanksgiving’s a black man’s holiday, bet you didn’t know.
ANTHONY: I, uh, no, I wasn’t aware.
CLIVE: 1863, Lincoln says to himself “This country done ripped in two, we need something bring us together, make us thankful we was almost in two but we not, we hanging by a thread, one thread, that’s still good. So he thinks on it and he says the whole land, everyone up in here, is invited to celebrate Thanksgiving. If the Indians and the pilgrims can do it, so can we, right? I mean think of all the foods Thanksgiving got? Those are stone cold New England it’s cold and about to get colder foods. And the black man—

On October 3, 1963, in the middle of the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln released a proclamation making the last Thursday of November a national holiday; a “day of Thanksgiving and Praise.” He did it at the prompting of writer Sarah Josepha Hale, who had been advocating for it to be a national holiday for 17 years. Before 1963, Thanksgiving was not widely celebrated outside of New England, and even there each state celebrated at a different time.

Highlight from the Thanksgiving Proclamation:

It has seemed to me fit and proper that [the gracious gifts of the Most High God] should be solemnly, reverently and gratefully acknowledged as with one heart and one voice by the whole American People. I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning in foreign lands, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next, as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens. And I recommend to them that while offering up the ascriptions justly due to Him for such singular deliverances and blessings, they do also, with humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience, commend to His tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged, and fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty Hand to heal the wounds of the nation and to restore it as soon as may be consistent with the Divine purposes to the full enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquillity and Union.

Read the complete text of the Thanksgiving Proclamation here.

Tiger Woods: A Thanksgiving Meltdown

DAVE (shaking his head): You get a load of that, huh? Greatest golfer in the whole wide world.
CLIVE: Morning news said she got that Cadillac good with those clubs.
DAVE: Well of course the guy’s sleeping around he’s richer than God: this is news? They’ll print anything I tell you. This is not news.

In the early morning hours of November 27, 2009, Tiger Woods got into a car accident as he was backing out of the driveway of his Windermere, FL home, according to ABC News:

Professional golfer Tiger Woods was injured in a car crash outside his Windermere, Fla., home early this morning, according to the Florida Highway Patrol.

The 33-year-old Woods was driving a 2009 Cadillac SUV alone when he hit a fire hydrant and then slammed into a tree at 2:25 a.m., according to police reports.

According to ABC affiliate WFTV, Windermere Police Chief Daniel Saylor said Woods’ wife, Elin Nordegren, used a golf club to smash out the back window and get her husband out of the car.

 She told officers she was in their house when she heard the accident and came outside.

Saylor told WFTV police officers found Woods lying in the street with his wife hovering over him. Saylor said Woods was in and out of consciousness when the officers arrived.

This happened after the National Enquirer leaked the story of Woods having an affair with a New York City party girl named Rachel Uchitel.

The ENQUIRER is reporting exclusively in its print edition that  the 34-year-old brunette, who has a reputation for dating married celebrities, has been telling friends about a jet-set liaison with 33-year-old Tiger  that began in June.

Multiple sources, who passed polygraph tests, say Rachel told them that she and Tiger also stay in touch during his frequent travels through phone calls and “sexting,” sending each other racy text messages on their cell phones.

Here are a few images from the 2009 Thanksgiving week events:

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The History of the Golf Tee

CLIVE: So all us get happy with Thanksgiving cause of Mr. Lincoln and we spread it around and that’s why it’s just one more thing we add to this country like peanut butter and the golf tee. We invented that shit, the golf tee: look it up, write a book. We—

Dr. George Franklin Grant, the African American man that invented the golf tee, attended Harvard Dental School and graduated in 1870. He saw the need for the invention after being displeased with how the ball traveled after he hit it from a sand mound. Read more about him here.

An excerpt:

Dr. Grant was unhappy with the mess that came with the tee shot. The process of teeing the ball up involved pinching moist sand to fashion a tee. Doing that 18 times a round was enough to annoy Dr. Grant, so he came up with an invention that would forever have an impact. On Dec. 12, 1899, he received U.S. patent No. 638,920, the world’s first patent for a golf tee.

In 1991, nearly a century after his patent, the United States Golf Association finally gave Grant recognition for his contribution to the game of golf.

He also became the first African American professor at Harvard University while creating another invention.

bhm-07-grant